Why We Write: A New Year’s Presidential Address

Please Note: the cover image of this work is an original Our Divide graphic Over the course of two years, I have written a few dozen articles for Our Divide. I have explored policing, healthcare, civil rights, you name it. However, I have never spent an article explaining this project and my motives for creating it.  Looking back, Our Divide has accomplished a lot since … Continue reading Why We Write: A New Year’s Presidential Address

Rep. Gosar and the Future of the GOP

A few weeks ago, a duly elected member of the United States House of Representatives posted a video produced by his taxpayer-funded Congressional office to his Twitter account depicting him as an anime character fatally stabbing another duly elected member of the United States House of Representatives and assaulting the duly elected President of the United States of America. If you’ve been keeping up with … Continue reading Rep. Gosar and the Future of the GOP

Marijuana is Legal in Connecticut— Now What?

Eighteen states have legalized majijuana usage on a recreational level. Connecticut being the most recent to join the pack. Before signing the bill, Governor Lamont  (D) pointed out the positive effects of majiuana legalization: “By allowing adults to possess cannabis, regulating its sale and content, training police officers in the latest techniques of detecting and preventing impaired driving, and expunging the criminal records of people … Continue reading Marijuana is Legal in Connecticut— Now What?

Joe Biden’s Promises: The Immigration Crisis

Since beginning his campaign on April 25, 2019, Biden gained popularity as a beacon of hope for immigrants of all origins. With promises of ending for-profit immigrant detention centers, halting border wall construction, and ending travel bans, he largely contrasted incumbent Donald Trump. While this contrast appealed greatly to voters, it may not have been what it seemed. The number of immigrants detained by ICE … Continue reading Joe Biden’s Promises: The Immigration Crisis

Letters from Rome: Let Us End the Partisanship

**for the reader: this article was originally published on October 26th, 2020. To my friends at Our Divide, This letter, I hope, will be the first of many. It is quite lengthy, but with the new restrictions imposed by the Italian government, I am often finding myself with much to think about, and little else to do other than to think about it. I duly … Continue reading Letters from Rome: Let Us End the Partisanship

Kid President: Balancing Children and Politics

I never imagined my CIT (counselor in training) summer job would transform into a moderator for a political debate. The days of comparing ice pops and superheroes had ended. As much as I instructed them to change the subject, I was as unsuccessful as Chris Wallace at the first 2020 presidential debate.  These lunchtime debates prompted me to start thinking about when I was first … Continue reading Kid President: Balancing Children and Politics

Will the Right to Vote Ever be Guaranteed?

“The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.” (U.S. Const. amend. XV, §1.) “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account … Continue reading Will the Right to Vote Ever be Guaranteed?

Reconciling with Russia: A Shaky State of Diplomatic Relations

212 years have passed since official diplomatic relations were established between the United States and Russia. With the approval of President James Madison and Emperor Alexander I, John Quincy Adams and Andrei Dashkov each received official recognition as the first foreign ministers to the other’s nation.1 Yet since this initial connection in 1809, the tides of time have seen the U.S.-Russian relationship rise, strain, cease, … Continue reading Reconciling with Russia: A Shaky State of Diplomatic Relations

Learn from Their Mistakes: Nonpartisan Policy Making during the Biden/Harris Administration:

Update by the author: Since the draft of this article was completed, Congress agreed upon an infrastructure bill with a 69-30 vote in the Senate, it appears Democrats have taken my advice! All jokes aside, it is very gratifying to see the American left reach out to the other side of the aisle, and I hope to see this bill give way to a more … Continue reading Learn from Their Mistakes: Nonpartisan Policy Making during the Biden/Harris Administration:

Breaking News: the Politics of Partisan Journalism

The political divide should not come as a shock. From the tense living rooms of politically divided families, to the shouts and insults hurled in the halls of Congress, it is clear that something is wrong. Simply put: we’re not talking about what we need to, and even when we do, we do it poorly. Why Politics is So Difficult to Talk About: The Pew … Continue reading Breaking News: the Politics of Partisan Journalism